Your Japanese Sales Farce

The force-fullness with which outdated “norms” are protected amazes even my pea brain.

Internal Outsourcing

Planning for the future, innovating, and leading others takes time, and that’s one thing most managers say they don’t have enough of.

How to Deal With Your Workload and Become More Productive

Swamped. Snowed under. Just trying to stay above water. Whatever office cliché you use to describe it, we have all been in that situation where we feel like we might be swallowed up by our workload. But there are ways to manage your to-do list to avoid feeling overwhelmed...

Do Your Employees Feel Valued?

Recognizing employees for first-rate work isn’t just a nice gesture: It boosts morale, increases productivity, and helps retain top performers...

GANBARE, NIPPON!

This Editorial provides a special tribute to Japan and her people for their strength of character, discipline, and resilience in the face of adversity and disaster. It also chronicles the actions taken by JHRS to respond to the crisis and discusses the ways Japan HR professionals can do their share in Japan's national rebuilding.

Generational Diversity in the Japanese Workplace

The old and the young. Can they work together? Read this Editorial to understand the myths, facts, and opportunities in addressing the generation gap issue in Japan.

Death by Mammoth

Standing strong in the howling wind, spear in hand, wolf-skinned shoulders, mark of the leader on his face and the scars to prove it.

Tags:

Conducting Successful Job Interviews

There is no doubt that a new hire is a significant investment and now more than ever it is important to make sure you are getting what you really need – and an interview is your most important tool in assessing whether or not the candidate is the right fit.

2010: A JHRS Review of the Year that Was

Learn what issues and challenges Japan-focused HR pros have dealt and managed for 2010 based from the monthly polls that the Japan HR Society (JHRS) conducted this year.

Mastering the Deadly Art of Change

Many businesses try to change...but few succeed.

At best, a few buzzwords and new reports become part of the company’s structure. At worst, programs crash and burn, and everyone becomes irreparably disillusioned with the revolving door of new-mission statements. According to David Shaner, a business consultant with a 100 percent success rate of change at companies including Duracell, Frito-Lay, Ryobi, and Gillette, the problem is that the implemented changes don’t address either individuals or the corporate culture. They’re only on the surface.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - employment
business